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The Hype Check: Brevin Jordan Scouting Report

While Kyle Pitts is the consensus TE1 of the 2021 draft class, Brevin Jordan was actually the top tight end coming out of high school. Jordan is generally ranked the TE3 in the 2021 class behind Pat Freiermuth and Kyle Pitts. In superflex rookie drafts, Jordan’s ADP is currently around a late second or early third round pick. Jordan is projected to be a day 2 pick in the NFL draft and is frequently mocked to the Jaguars, Bills, Bengals, and Colts. The 6’3, 245 pound junior out of Miami could make an immediate impact for any of those teams.

By Rob Mongole

While Kyle Pitts is ranked as the consensus TE1 of the 2021 draft class, Brevin Jordan was actually the top rated tight end coming out of high school.  Jordan is generally ranked the TE3 in the 2021 class behind Pat Freiermuth and Kyle Pitts. In superflex rookie drafts, Jordan’s ADP is currently around a late second or early third round pick.  Jordan is projected to be a day 2 pick in the NFL draft and is frequently mocked to the Jaguars, Bills, Bengals, and Colts.  The 6’3, 245 pound junior out of Miami could make an immediate impact for any of those teams. 

Positives: 

Athleticism and Break Out Age:

Jordan was the top tight end coming out of high school and managed to breakout for the Hurricanes during his freshman year.  His breakout age of 18.1 is in the 99th percentile. He was the third option for Miami during his freshman year. However, Jordan was the second most targeted player on the team during his final two years in Miami. Jordan increased both his target share (11.8% to 13.9%) and yards per route run (9.0 to 15.2) between his freshman and junior seasons. (Stats from PlayerProfiler https://www.playerprofiler.com/nfl/brevin-jordan/).

These numbers are not too far behind Kyle Pitts who posted a 14.2% target share and 17.9 yards per route run during his junior year at Florida. Jordan’s yards per route run is ahead of Pat Freiermuth’s 14.2, but behind Freiermuth’s 17.1% target share.

Jordan posted only a 4.78 40-yard dash time in high school, but seems to play significantly faster than it.  Jordan’s tape displays that he is an athletic tight end capable of running away from defenders and he gets up to full speed quickly. He recently posted this tweet on his personal account with the caption “4.56.”

Yards after Catch Ability:

Miami typically got the ball in Jordan’s hands close to the line of scrimmage. Jordan frequently ran simple flat routes, bubble screens, or blocked a rusher before slipping out into the flat.  These routes highlighted Jordan’s biggest strength, his after the catch ability.  He is bigger than the defensive backs and faster than the linebackers who tried to bring him down.  Jordan also displays good wiggle to escape would be tacklers and seldom took big or unnecessary hits.  He led all collegiate tight ends in YAC this season.

Route Running:

When Jordan wasn’t running simple screens or flat routes, he displayed solid route running and the ability to find soft spots in zone coverage.  His route tree was limited to flats, posts, seams, and the occasional out route. However, Jordan has good ability to sell other routes and displayed a great stutter step which he frequently used to sell an intermediate route before getting open further down the field.

Blocking:

Although Jordan is undersized for the position, he has proven adept at blocking from both an inline role and as a move tight end.  While I don’t believe NFL teams will frequently use Jordan as an inline tight end, he looks more comfortable than anticipated as a run blocker.  Multiple scouts have called Jordan the best blocker in the class.  This should help keep Jordan on the field in short yardage situations.

Negatives:

Size and Contested Catch Ability:

At 6’ 3” and 245 pounds, Jordan is undersized for the tight end position. I have concerns about his red zone usage at the NFL level.  During my film review, I watched all 13 of Jordan’s collegiate touchdowns and did not see a single jump ball thrown for him in the endzone. Jordan will not tower over NFL linebackers like Pat Freiermuth or Kyle Pitts who each have a few inches on Jordan.  Miami used him creatively in the red zone to get Jordan some easy looks, but at least early on in his career, he will likely not be the offensive focal point like Jordan was at Miami. 

Jordan caught just 11 of 33 contested targets per PFF.  This is a very limited sample size and should not be aggressively held against Jordan, but it is something to watch at the NFL level. The bigger red flag is Miami’s apparent unwillingness to throw contested balls to Jordan in the red zone.  I want my tight ends to have more touchdown upside and not just do damage between the 20s.

Red Zone Usage:

Jordan’s route tree in the red zone was limited essentially to running a flat route, which Jordan was absolutely deadly at running.  Of his 13 collegiate touchdowns, 7 were red zone touchdowns (and 6 were under 10 yards). Four of Jordan’s red zone touchdowns came on either flat routes or shallow out routes. The remaining three were scored over the middle.  He also had a handful of scores from just outside of the redzone, with three touchdowns of either 24 or 25 yards.  Jordan ran a deadly post route for all three of these touchdowns.

Verdict and Pro Comps:

Brevin Jordan is most often compared to other undersized tight ends such as Irv Smith, Jr. and Jonnu Smith. Measurable-wise, Jordan is more similar to Jonnu Smith. Tape-wise, I see a lot of Irv Smith in Brevin Jordan’s game. Both Irv Smith and Jordan have some question marks surrounding their contested catch ability and were not asked to make a whole lot of contested catches at the collegiate level.  While Smith and Jordan are both undersized, both are great blockers.

Irv Smith has not broken out at the NFL level yet, despite his dominance at Alabama. In his two seasons with the Vikings, Smith has never had more than 365 yards receiving in a season. While not inspiring, this shouldn’t be held against Smith or Jordan as tight ends are notorious for taking a lengthy amount of time to adjust to the pro level.

I currently have Jordan ranked as my TE3.  I have only done a cursory scouting report on Pat Freiermuth and believe Freiermuth is a guy who does everything well, but does nothing great.  My expectations coming into this article was that Jordan would have a higher ceiling than Freiermuth and potentially be the TE2 in my rankings.  I came away with the opposite impression.  

Unless Jordan lands in an offense that can cater to his skill set, his ceiling is going to be capped below other undersized tight ends like Jordan Reed and Evan Engram.  Not only do I have Jordan ranked as my TE3, Jordan is also in his own tier, behind Pitts and Freiermuth who each have their own tier as well.  

Jordan is not a red zone monster and currently has limited touchdown upside at the NFL level.  I can see Jordan moving into tier 2 with Freiermuth if he lands in an ideal offense, otherwise he is someone I will likely be passing on in the first two rounds of rookie drafts.  Ideally, Jordan will land in a spread offense like Arizona, Jacksonville, or the Rams where he can be mostly utilized in a slot role. He would also fit in well with a creative offensive mind like Frank Reich in Indianapolis who has demonstrated an ability to make the tight end position fantasy relevant and will move him all over the formation. 

I would be willing to acquire Jordan with a mid-third round pick in superflex formats, behind guys with more upside like Tamorrion Terry, Rhamondre Stevenson, Jermar Jefferson, Tylan Wallace, and D’Wayne Eskridge. 

Rob Mongole – Writer
Ride or Dynasty
Twitter: @TheRotoRob

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